No Child Left Behind Is Left Behind

The 13 year old No Child Left Behind school reform bill has been replaced. It has been replaced by a new law, signed by President Obama last Thursday. Certainly, one of the most contentious issues of the old bill was the Common Core. Is the new bill an improvement?

Dr. David MielkeThe 13 year old No Child Left Behind school reform bill has been replaced.  It has been replaced by a new law,  signed by President Obama last Thursday.  Certainly, one of the most contentious issues of the old bill was the Common Core.  Is the new bill an improvement?  Is there any question that legislation was necessary to try to improve public education? Have standards been changed allowing far more authority and responsibility to the states?  Is there too much autonomy left to the states?  Was the new bill the “Right Thing to do?”  Let’s look at some issues:
1. There have been complaints for years that No Child Left Behind spurred excessive testing in public schools and used unrealistic goals to label too many schools as failing.  Schools were required to adopt a set of standards, the Common Core, that were the basis for assessing the public school results and to receive federal funding.  Critics said the old law set up a national school board.  No Child Left Behind actually expired in 2007 and had been continued on a yearly basis, keeping the requirements in place.

2. Since 1969, test scores in reading and math have hardly budged for public school students of all ages, even though per pupil spending has nearly doubled and school staff has increased more than 80%.

3. Many argued that President Obama had already undermined the legislation by granting waivers to a number of states that adopted their own prescriptions for overhauling public education.

4. The new law will guide about $26 billion federal spending annually for preschool through 12th grade.  It provides $250 million a year to expand access to preschool for low income and disadvantaged families through a competitive grant program.

5. Under the bill, states will still have to test students yearly in math and reading in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school.

6. The bill ends federal guidelines for defining school quality and requires states to set up their own accountability systems to measure improvement.

7. It also allows states to determine how to intervene in the bottom 5% of schools and those with low graduation rates.

8.  The bill bars the federal government from giving states incentives to use any particular learning standards such as the Common Core and prohibits federal mandates on how teachers are evaluated.  The Obama administration had given states incentives to link student results on annual tests to teacher evaluations.  Teaching unions had criticized using test data for teacher evaluations, saying it led to excessive test preparation and anxiety.

9. Proponents of the legislation believe the law will usher in more flexibility, stability, higher standards, better teaching and more accountability because states are empowered to develop their own standards and how to revamp schools that don’t make the grade.  Critics argue that by removing some federal oversight, some states would feel too little pressure to fix the worst performing schools.

Is the increased state and local control in the legislation a positive move?  Should there be some national standards?  Should teacher evaluations be tied to annual test results?  Will there be a new and improved accountability for public education?  Is this law the “Right Thing to do?” In general, increasing state and local control and minimizing federal intervention is a positive move.  There is a concern that the state control can be heavily influenced by special interest groups and that standards across the country will vary dramatically.  Removing the potential tie between test results and teacher evaluations is worrisome.  We will have to depend on each state to resist the pressures of the unions to eliminate a level of accountability that should be a part of each state system.  Test results and graduation rates are hard numbers for evaluations—what other hard numbers will be used instead?  The federal government will spend $26 billion on public education with no accountability—one more program that doles out money without any measurement of results.  The bottom line is can our states improve public education in the US?  On an international basis, we are losing our educational edge and need to improve.

Educational Favoritism?

For the second time in 6 months, Governor Snyder outlined his plan to restructure the Detroit Public School system a week ago. The purpose is to help improve academic performance and to start paying down the more than half billion dollars in operating debt. The bailout deal for the city of Detroit made sense and has been very successful so far. But what about the public school system? Should the state start paying off the debt and further subsidize the operations of the Detroit public school system? Isn’t there an emergency manager system already in place to deal with public school problems? What about the other public school systems in Michigan that are also experiencing severe financial problems or may in the future? Is this proposal setting up a precedent for more state intervention across the state? Is this proposal showing a favoritism for one system at the expense of other public schools in the state? What is the “Right Thing to do?” Let’s look at some issues:
1. Detroit Public Schools lost close to 100,000 students over the past 10 years. The final enrollments for this year have not been released yet, but last year the district had about 47,000 students.
2. The plan proposes breaking the system into 2 pieces, the existing district that would deal exclusively with paying down the existing $515 million debt and a new Detroit Community School District that would be charged with everything else, from teaching the students to negotiating teacher contracts. The new legislation, expected to be introduced within a couple weeks would take effect July 1st.
3. The existing Detroit Public Schools would be phased out completely once the debt is paid off. The City’s Financial Review Commission would oversee the old district while the debt is being repaid.
4. Under the plan, the state would provide $70 million a year from the School Aid Fund for 10 years to pay off the debt, for a total cost of about $715 million. An additional $200 million would go to the new Detroit Community School District for startup funding and to cover expected operating losses due to potential declining enrollments. The new district would also be responsible for about $1.5 billion in pension obligations.
5. The new funding would come from the state school aid fund. It is equivalent to a $50 per student increase, although the Governor has said other school districts per-pupil funding amounts would not be cut. There are concerns that the increase could shift dollars from other state districts.
6. A new Detroit Education Commission would be created to govern the Detroit Community School District. Its members initially would be appointed by the Governor and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, with elections phased in beginning in 2017. The board would be majority elected by 2019 and fully elected by 2021.
7. A new Detroit Education Commission would be created, with oversight of the new Detroit school system, the Education Achievement Authority and charter public schools.
8. The Governor would not say whether or not the alternative to this plan is to take DPS into bankruptcy. Should the district default on its debt and enter bankruptcy, the cost to the state may be much higher than $715 million, because the total debt also includes the $1.5 billion in pension obligations.
9. DPS has been under the control of an emergency manager for years with the objective of getting the financial condition of the school district improved and under control.
10. Reaction by the legislature has been mixed. It is likely to be a challenge to get legislators outside Detroit to agree to the plan.
Is this new plan an admission that the emergency manager system is ineffective? Is there sufficient money in the School Aid Fund to support the increased funding for Detroit without impacting other state districts? Will this set a precedent to also bail out school systems currently under emergency managers, such as Benton Harbor, Flint, Saginaw and others? Is a DPS bankruptcy possible? What is the “Right Thing to do?” I appreciate that the Governor continues to support the revival of Detroit and education is a key foundation for that effort. However, without a system to provide support for other state school systems that may face the same financial obstacles after being under control of emergency managers, this plan is incomplete. The School Aid Fund has been financially challenged for years and may not have extra funding available to support the plan without impacting other districts. Education is critical for the entire state and to favor Detroit alone is not the answer to those issues we face.

Dr. David Mielke, Retired Dean of the College of Business at Eastern Michigan University

Dr. David MielkeFor the second time in 6 months, Governor Snyder outlined his plan to restructure the Detroit Public School system a week ago.  The purpose is to help improve academic performance and to start paying down the more than half billion dollars in operating debt.  The bailout deal for the city of Detroit made sense and has been very successful so far.  But what about the public school system?  Should the state start paying off the debt and further subsidize the operations of the Detroit public school system?   Isn’t there an emergency manager system already in place to deal with public school problems?  What about the other public school systems in Michigan that are also experiencing severe financial problems or may in the future?  Is this proposal setting up a precedent for more state intervention across the state?  Is this proposal showing a favoritism for one system at the expense of other public schools in the state?  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  Let’s look at some issues:

1. Detroit Public Schools lost close to 100,000 students over the past 10 years.  The final enrollments for this year have not been released yet, but last year the district had about 47,000 students.

2. The plan proposes breaking the system into 2 pieces, the existing district that would deal exclusively with paying down the existing $515 million debt and a new Detroit Community School District that would be charged with everything else, from teaching the students to negotiating teacher contracts.  The new legislation, expected to be introduced within a couple weeks would take effect July 1st.

3. The existing Detroit Public Schools would be phased out completely once the debt is paid off.  The City’s Financial Review Commission would oversee the old district while the debt is being repaid.

4. Under the plan, the state would provide $70 million a year from the School Aid Fund for 10 years to pay off the debt, for a total cost of about $715 million.  An additional $200 million would go to the new Detroit Community School District for startup funding and to cover expected operating losses due to potential declining enrollments.  The new district would also be responsible for about $1.5 billion in pension obligations.

5. The new funding would come from the state school aid fund.  It is equivalent to a $50 per student increase, although the Governor has said other school districts per-pupil funding amounts would not be cut.  There are concerns that the increase could shift dollars from other state districts.

6. A new Detroit Education Commission would be created to govern the Detroit Community School District.  Its members initially would be appointed by the Governor and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, with elections phased in beginning in 2017.  The board would be majority elected by 2019 and fully elected by 2021.

7. A new Detroit Education Commission would be created, with oversight of the new Detroit school system, the Education Achievement Authority and charter public schools.

8. The Governor would not say whether or not the alternative to this plan is to take DPS into bankruptcy.  Should the district default on its debt and enter bankruptcy, the cost to the state may be much higher than $715 million, because the total debt also includes the $1.5 billion in pension obligations.

9. DPS has been under the control of an emergency manager for years with the objective of getting the financial condition of the school district improved and under control.

10. Reaction by the legislature has been mixed.  It is likely to be a challenge to get legislators outside Detroit to agree to the plan.

Is this new plan an admission that the emergency manager system is ineffective?  Is there sufficient money in the School Aid Fund to support the increased funding for Detroit without impacting other state districts?  Will this set a precedent to also bail out school systems currently under emergency managers, such as Benton Harbor, Flint, Saginaw and others?  Is a DPS bankruptcy possible?  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  I appreciate that the Governor continues to support the revival of Detroit and education is a key foundation for that effort.  However, without a system to provide support for other state school systems that may face the same financial obstacles after being under control of emergency managers, this plan is incomplete.  The School Aid Fund has been financially challenged for years and may not have extra funding available to support the plan without impacting other districts.  Education is critical for the entire state and to favor Detroit alone is not the answer to those issues we face.

Free Education for Everyone..Except the Taxpayers

President Obama greatly expanded benefits of the college student loan program. It is expected that he will announce a new plan to provide free community college tuition for students. As a result of these actions have we in effect provided free college education and now community college education? What are the costs to the taxpayers? What are the implications to the Federal budget building process? Should we be adding to the Federal deficit? What is the “Right Thing to do?”

Dr. David Mielke, Retired Dean of the College of Business at Eastern Michigan University

Dr. David MielkePresident Obama greatly expanded benefits of the college student loan program.  It is expected that he will announce a new plan to provide free community college tuition for students.  As a result of these actions have we in effect provided free college education and now community college education?  What are the costs to the taxpayers?  What are the implications to the Federal budget building process?  Should we be adding to the Federal deficit?  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  Let’s look at some issues:

1. The federal government has taken over the college student loan program with total student debt now over $1 trillion.  The administration has provided students with options that allow them punt on repayment without triggering delinquency or defaults.

2. Student loans are not forgiven in the case of bankruptcy.  However, under certain circumstances students can have their loans forgiven if they work 10 years for a nonprofit or the government.  They can be forgiven over 20 yours working in the private sector.

3. The forbearance benefit lets borrowers postpone payment for up to 3 years.  Forbearance can also cure the delinquency status of a loan.  When granted, payments cease and the loan is considered in good standing.

4. Loan balances in forbearance were about 12.5% of those in repayment in 2006.  In 2013, they were 13.3% and they are now at 16%, or $125 billion of the $778 billion in repayment.

5. Income based repayment plans are also increasing allowing borrowers to suspend or reduce payments on their loans and cure severely delinquent loans.  The mechanics of the plans are a bit complicated, but for borrowers with income below 150% of poverty, payments are zero.  Borrowers who earn more than that make payments between 1% and 15% of their incomes.  After 10, 20 or 25 years, depending on the program, the government forgives any outstanding balances and the taxpayers eat the loss.  The White House predicted in 2010, that the income based program would cost $1.7 billion that year.  They now estimate that it will cost $7.6 billion this year.

6. The Obama administration estimated in 2012 that the average amount forgiven in income based repayment plans will be $41,000 per borrower.

7. Despite more borrowers taking advantage of benefits to suspend or lower payments, the share of borrowers in default is still trending up.  It now stands at 19.8% of borrowers whose loans have come due, some 7.1 million borrowers with $103 billion in outstanding balances.

8. It is expected that in the State of the Union address, the President will propose new federal entitlements—free community college tuition, that is public institutions that offer 2 or 3 year programs.  The proposal would waive tuition for students who attend community colleges at least half time and maintain a 2.5 GPA (about a C+ average).

9. Washington would cover 75% of tuition on the condition that states pay the rest.  To be eligible, community colleges would have to offer academic credits that transfer to 4 year or occupational programs that produce high graduation rates and degrees in demand by employers.  The Administration does not specify how that can be measured.  Important to also consider that community colleges do not control which credits will transfer–that is up to the 4 year institutions.

10. Tuition at public 2 year colleges average about $3,300 which is less than the $5,090 in average student aid available now.  Low income students can also receive up to $5,730 in Pell grants.

 

The Congress will be working on a new budget soon.  Where will the money come from to cover the growing existing student loan losses?  Do we already have a problem with the current student loan programs without starting a new one?  Do we need further financial aid for students to enroll in community colleges?  Where will the tight sate budgets find the money to pay for community college tuition?  Will Congress be able to deal with a situation where members could be perceived to oppose higher ed?  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  It is time to restrict the existing student loan programs and to tighten the credit terms.  There are already financial aid programs available to assist with community college tuition.  Free tuition is not free to the taxpayers.

To Spend More or Not Spend More (on Education), that is the Question

I expect most people have seen the political ad criticizing Governor Snyder for cutting $1 billion from public education. And with that criticism comes Mark Schauer’s promise to spend more on public education. This is a common campaign issue, one that has surfaced in Florida, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Kansas and elsewhere. Is there a problem with funding for public education? Is a call for spending more a no-brainer—we should do it. Or is this a case of lack of information to make a decision? There certainly is concern that that US has fallen far behind in basic education relative to the rest of the world. What is the “Right Thing to do?”

Dr. David Mielke I expect most people have seen the political ad criticizing Governor Snyder for cutting $1 billion from public education.  And with that criticism comes Mark Schauer’s promise to spend more on public education.  This is a common campaign issue, one that has surfaced in Florida, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Kansas and elsewhere.  Is there a problem with funding for public education?  Is a call for spending more a no-brainer—we should do it.  Or is this a case of lack of information to make a decision?  There certainly is concern that that US has fallen far behind in basic education relative to the rest of the world.  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  Let’s look at some issues:

1. It is easy to see why candidates promise more money for schools.  As long as taxes are ignored and no mention is made of current levels of expenditure, calling for more spending is a no-brainer.

2. In a recently released Education Next poll of a nationally representative sample of the public, 60% of Americans say they want to spend more.  Among parents, 70% want more spending and 75% of teachers agree.

3. But, by drilling down, that enthusiasm evaporates and a different story unfolds.  The people surveyed were broken into 3 equally representative groups.  The first was asked whether they thought school spending to fund public schools in your district should increase, decrease or stay the same.  60% said spending should increase.

4. A second group was asked the same question, but was first told the level of expenditure per pupil in their district in 2011, the most recent year data is available.  In this case 46% said to spend more.

5. A third group was given the same information, but was asked whether they thought taxes to fund public schools in your district should increase, decrease or stay the same.  In this case, only 26% said spending should increase.

6. There also appears to be an illusion that the rest of the nation’s schools are expensive, but their local schools are a bargain.  When asked to estimate per-pupil spending nationwide, the public makes an average estimate of $10,155, almost exactly the $10,615 per pupil estimated by the Bureau of Census for school expenditures in 2012.  But when asked about costs locally, Americans think their schools are giving their children an education at a reasonable price.  On average they say the cost is only $6,486 per pupil in their district.  Local estimates by parents and teachers are even lower.

7. Some speculate that the differing estimates are partly due to differences in news coverage.  National school expenditures are a regular part of debate between Democrats and Republicans, making the topic worthy of national media.  Local school costs per pupil may not get the same attention.  It is a question whether or not local officials even report the local per pupil costs.  I did access the National Center for Educational Statistics website and found the average per pupil cost in Michigan in 2011 was $10,561—almost identical to the national average at that time.

8. Most people are not aware of the source of revenues for public schools.  On average 45% of school costs come from local revenues, 45% from the states and 10% from the federal government.  In Michigan, in 2011, it was 31% local, 55% state and 14% federal.

9. People in general also think their local schools are better than the nation’s schools.  In another Education Next poll, 58% of adults with school age children give a grade of A or B to their local schools, but only 26% give those same 2 grades to the nations’ schools.

Whatever the reasons for the misperceptions, it appears clear that parents, teachers and the public in general all think that local schools are giving them more for less.  Is increasing funding for public schools a no-brainer?  When that statement is made do we have enough information to agree?  Do we need more transparency about school funding and better press coverage to aid our decisions?  Since the state is providing 55% of school funding, versus a 45% national average, should local spending increase if the schools are to receive more?  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  We need more information before that question can be answered.  For a campaign issue as important as school funding, where is the analysis by the press?  But that may not fit in a sound bite.

Who’s Teaching theTeachers?

U.S. children score lower on standardized tests than students in many developed countries. The U.S. ranks 17th in reading, 23rd in science and 31st in math, behind countries like Slovenia and Poland. One of the main differences is that high achieving countries have a higher level of difficulty for becoming teachers. Concern is growing that we will become less competitive globally unless our education system improves. It may be even more critical in Michigan because of our relatively low performance. Education Week ranked Michigan’s K-12 system 24th, 23rd in high school graduation rate, 36th in percent of adults with a college diploma, 39th in 4th grade math and 30th in 8th grade reading, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress exam. How do we start to improve the educational performance in the U.S. and even more importantly in Michigan? What is the “Right Thing to do?”

Dr. David Mielke is the Retired Dean of the College of Business at Eastern Michigan University.

 

 Dr. David MielkeU.S. children score lower on standardized tests than students in many developed countries.  The U.S. ranks 17th in reading, 23rd in science and 31st in math, behind countries like Slovenia and Poland.  One of the main differences is that high achieving countries have a higher level of difficulty for becoming teachers.  Concern is growing that we will become less competitive globally unless our education system improves.  It may be even more critical in Michigan because of our relatively low performance.  Education Week ranked Michigan’s K-12 system 24th, 23rd in high school graduation rate, 36th in percent of adults with a college diploma, 39th in 4th grade math and 30th in 8th grade reading, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress exam.  How do we start to improve the educational performance in the U.S. and even more importantly in Michigan?  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  Let’s look at some issues:

1. Critics state that teacher preparation programs, universities, routinely accept students with high school GPAs below 3.0 and lower ACT scores than for other majors.

2. Critics also state that there is wide variability in the quality of programs and that states should shut down parts because of poor performance.

3. State certification exams are so easy that the pass rates are similar to cosmetology.  The few that fail can take the exam over and over until they pass.

4. The state mandates student teaching for just 12 weeks, while plumbers must apprentice for 3 years.

5. One in 8 Michigan teachers have one year or less experience in the classroom, and one in 5 has less than 3 years of experience.

6. A 2003 study found that a student in the 50th percentile of his peers entering a classroom with a highly effective teacher could end the school year scoring in the 96th percentile, in an ineffective teacher’s classroom, the child could leave scoring at the 37th percentile.

7. The nation spends $15 billion a year on salary bumps for teachers who earn masters degrees, even though research shows the diplomas don’t necessarily lead to higher student achievement.

8. Some states are getting rid of the automatic pay increases for masters degrees.  North Carolina eliminated the increase, Tennessee adopted a policy that mandates districts adopt salary scales with less emphasis on degrees and more on teacher performance.  Newark, NJ recently decided to pay teachers for masters degrees only if they are linked to the district’s new math and reading standards.  Research has shown that teachers with masters degrees are no more effective unless the degrees are in math or science.

9. About 52% of the nation’s 3.4 million public elementary and high school teachers have a masters degree and about 90% are from education programs.

10. Of the 730,635 master’s degrees awarded by U.S. colleges in 2011, 25% were in education, the second highest percentage of any field behind only business.

 

As one critic explained, despite the state’s imperative to improve student learning, there’s been little concerted effort to change the way we build our teacher’s skills.  In fact, the colleges that train them, the state that certifies them and the schools that hire them don’t even have a good sense of what a highly effective teacher looks like.  What is the “Right Thing to do?”  Can we continue to have lower standards for students entering education degree programs, require less on the job training than we do for plumbers, have certification exams on par with cosmetology and then pay more for a master’s degree which do not improve student performance?  Our universities should be leading the way.  At a minimum entrance standards should be raised, a more demanding curriculum developed, more actual classroom participation, a bar raised for state exams and pay increases for results—not degrees.  My guess, they won’t do it—we have a glut of students graduating with education degrees, low entrance requirements mean more students which means more tuition and in times of decreased state aid and declining numbers of high school graduates, every tuition dollar counts.  Alternatively, it is an excellent time to create a highly competitive, rigorous program to attract the best and brightest and jobs.

The Lucy Ann Lance Show, 1290 WLBY – Monday, September 23, 2013

Is Michigan’s Highest Court Corrupted? – Former Michigan Supreme Court Justice Elizabeth Weaver (R-Glen Arbor), Author of Judicial Deceit: Tyranny & Unnecessary Secrecy at the Michigan Supreme Court

Listen to Hour 1: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/9-23a.mp3]
Listen to Hour 2:
[audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/9-23b.mp3]

 

Chief Justice Elizabeth Weaver (Ret)Is Michigan’s Highest Court Corrupted? – Former Michigan Supreme Court Justice Elizabeth Weaver (R-Glen Arbor), Author of Judicial Deceit:  Tyranny & Unnecessary Secrecy at the Michigan Supreme Court – It’s called ‘dark money’ – judicial campaign contributions that can’t be tracked to individuals or corporations.  Now a former Michigan Supreme Court Justice is alleging Michigan’s highest court often rules based on special interest groups that bankroll judges’ election campaigns.  Visit www.judicialdeceit.com for more info.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/weaver.mp3]

 

Denise MurrayAnn Arbor Ypsilanti Regional Chamber of Commerce:  40th Anniversary of Briarwood Mall – Denise Murray, Director of Marketing & Business Development, Briarwood Mall – Briarwood became Ann Arbor’s second mall when it was built in 1973 in a field at Eisenhower and State.  The last renovation took place in 2003, but a decade later the mall has been undergoing a major renovation once again.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/a2y.mp3]

 

 

Dr. David MielkeBusiness EthosWisconsin Revisited –  Dr. David Mielke, Retired Dean of the College of Business at EMU – It’s been two years since Wisconsin’s Governor Scott Walker managed to reform union laws, allowing members each year to vote on certifying the union as their representative.  Dr. Mielke takes a look at what has transpired since then.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/ethos.mp3]

 

 

 

George ShirleyBack to School with The HistoryMakersOpera Singer George Shirley – Renowned opera singer George Shirley will visit Ann Arbor’s Logan Elementary School (Friday, Sept. 27) and Carpenter School (Friday, Oct. 4) for the 4th Annual Back to School With The HistoryMakers Program.  The idea is to place black leaders into schools across the nation on a single day in order to make a statement about the importance of inspiring today’s youth and to call on them to commit to excellence and to finish their education. The HistoryMakers is the nation’s largest African American video oral history archive. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is chairing this nationwide effort with the goal of having more than 500 black leaders go “back to school” in 68 cities and 30 states.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/shirley.mp3]

 

 

Milan Chamber LogoMilan Area Chamber of Commerce: 11th Annual Senior Health Fair – Jennifer Michalak, Director, Milan Seniors for Healthy Living – From vaccines to medicine disposal and even document shredding, the Senior Health Fair hosted by Milan Seniors for Healthy Living provides a wealth of resources geared towards the needs of senior citizens.  The fair takes place Tuesday, October 1, 2013 from 12 PM-4 PM at the Milan Senior Center, 45 Neckel Ct., Milan, Mi.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/milan.mp3]

 

 

Ingrid Ault and Carol KammThink Local First: Selling Online for the Holidays – Ingrid Ault, TLF Executive Director; Carol Kamm, Owner, Encore Online Resale – What’s in your closet, attic, basement, garage, or storage room? The average household has more than $2,000 in unused items, just gathering dust. Encore’s eBay® Consignment Service helps you turn those old items into cash.  Find out what’s expected to be big sellers for the holidays.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/092313/ault.mp3]

 

The Lucy Ann Lance Show, 1290 WLBY – Thursday, August 15, 2013

Ann Arbor Public Schools Superintendent Contract: Liz Margolis, AAPS Communications Director – Ann Arbor’s new superintendent of schools will earn…

Listen to Hour 1: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/081213/8-15a.mp3]
Listen to Hour 2: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/081213/8-15b.mp3]

 

Mike Fitzpatrick

Dexter Area Chamber of Commerce: Mike Fitzpatrick, Financial Advisor, Edward Jones Mike Fitzpatrick recently took over one of Dexter’s two Edward Jones’ offices, and is handling everything from college savings to retirement.  While he and his family have lived in Dexter for the past seven years, it’s what brought them to the area originally that explains why they decided to settle here.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/081213/dexter.mp3]

 

 

 

Chris TravellRon KleinfelterTech Thursday: GM Dealers Listen to Customer Feedback in Real Time –  Maritz Research’s Chris Travell, VP, Strategic Consulting; Ron Kleinfelter, Director, Business Management – GM dealerships across the country are responding to customer feedback more quickly thanks to the DealerPulse app from Maritz Research. It is giving General Motors dealers the ability to leverage new mobile technology to address customer service issues in real time. DealerPulse Mobile is an app that sends up-to-date feedback from customers straight to dealers’ smartphones and tablets, making it convenient and easy for GM dealers to read and act on what customers are saying.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/081213/tech.mp3]

 

 

Liz Margolis 2 AAPS 8 21 2009

Ann Arbor Public Schools Superintendent Contract:  Liz Margolis, AAPS Communications Director – Ann Arbor’s new superintendent of schools will earn a salary of $200,000 per year with a bonus built into her contract for longevity.  The Board of Education this week approved the contract for Dr. Jeanice Kerr Swift, who will be in Ann Arbor to start her new job at the end of the month.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/081213/margolis.mp3]

 

 

The Lucy Ann Lance Show, Live from Dexter Daze on 1290 WLBY – Saturday, August 10, 2013

Dexter in the Mitten: Katherine Larson, Artist – A fine artist, muralist, graphic designer, and classical singer, Katherine Larson is known for her many covers of the Ann Arbor Observer…

Thanks to these great businesses for sponsoring our Dexter Daze broadcast!

 

LaFontaine Chevrolet in Dexter
LaFontaine The Family Deal LaFontaine Chevrolet

 

 

 

Palmer Insurance
Palmer Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click & Listen to HOUR 1 (9 AM-10 AM): [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/lal-1.mp3]

 

Paula Palmer Burns in the broadcast booth

Dexter Daze:  Welcome to Dexter! – Paula Palmer Burns, Owner, Palmer Insurance / Past President, Dexter Area Chamber of Commerce – This popular two-day event is bigger than ever this year, as Dexter Daze expands from Monument Park to the new Mill Creek Park.  The venue offers a another stage for music and performances.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/palmer.mp3]

 

 

 

Lydia the CatPet of the Week:  LydiaDeb Kern, Humane Society of Huron Valley , along with Dean Erskine – Our Pet of the Week is Lydia, an eleven-year-old orange and white kitty on the prowl for her forever home. She is affectionate, incredibly loving, and as confident as they come. She would work best in a quieter home and with an adopter with some kitty experienced. Lydia knows exactly what she wants in life. Listen to this week’s interview at the link below for more info about Lydia and many other animals waiting for their forever homes who are available from the Humane Society of Huron Valley.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/pet.mp3]

 

 

 

Quaila Pant with vehicleQuaila Pant, Business Development Manager, LaFontaine Automotive Group  Community events like Dexter Daze are made better when the business community shows its support for them. LaFontaine Chevrolet in Dexter has been one of those leaders, showing its commitment to the community in a number of ways.  Throughout the summer, you can enter to win
a two-year lease on a vehicle from each LaFontaine dealership.  That includes a Chevy Malibu at the Dexter store, a Buick Encore from the Ann Arbor store, and a Dodge Ram from the Saline
store.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/pant.mp3]

 

 

Mary Morgan

Mary Morgan, Publisher, Ann Arbor Chronicle Ann Arbor’s Primary Election yielded some interesting results this past week.  Mary tells us what happened and takes a look at the races in November.  Ann Arbor City Council approved a bike share program and voted to close a portion of Main Street during UM Football games.  There’s a battle over 7th Hour classes in the Ann Arbor Public high schools, and the Chronicle offers a guest editorial on the ACLU’s lawsuit filed this week.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/mary.mp3]

 

 

Pete Nowakowski and Stacey Rayer

 

Around the Home: Artful Surroundings – Pete Nowakowski, BRAG Ann Arbor’s Marketing & Communications Director; Stacey Rayer, Garden Center Manager, BLOOM! Garden Center – When adding beauty to your home’s outdoor surroundings, don’t stop at the plants and landscaping. Art is a perfect way to create a gorgeous yard.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/home.mp3]

 

 

 

Click & Listen to HOUR 2 (9 AM-10 AM): [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/lal-2.mp3]

 

Victoria Shon

Paint Dexter Plein Air Festival – Victoria Schon, Dexter Arts, Culture and Heritage Committee – The iconic scene of an artist in a big brimmed hat with an easel painting or sketching an outdoor scene will come alive this week in Dexter.  This type of art is called plein air – or open air – and the Dexter Arts, Culure and Heritage Committe is hosting  a festival to attract these artists to the town from August 13-17.  Visit www.dextermi.gov/arts for details.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/schon.mp3]

 

 

 

Tina Miller 2011

 

Healthy Living:  Breakfast Boosts Weight Loss – Tina Miller, R.D. / Meijer Healthy Living Advisor: How do you start your day?  A new study shows that dieters who eat a healthy breakfast are more likely to shed the pounds.  Read Tina’s blog, which includes great recipes for you to try, here.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/tina.mp3]

 

 

 

Karen Bentley

Dexter’s Premier Event Expands, Draws Bigger Crowds – Karen Bentley, Co-Chair, Dexter Daze – Nestled along the banks of the Huron River, the Village of Dexter is a friendly, small town located just minutes to the west of Ann Arbor and east of Chelsea.  Dexter Daze celebrates the town’s heritage and showcases its amenities.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/bentley.mp3]

 

 

 

Michigan Travels - David LorenzYolanda Fletcher

 

Travel Michigan:  Attracting the UK to Pure Michigan – David Lorenz, Manager, Industry Relations & International Marketing, Travel Michigan; Yolanda Fletcher, Partner, Cellet Travel Services – Billing itself as the gateway to sport in the USA, Cellet Travel Services provides tours from the UK to the United States.  Michigan, with its four seasons and active lifestyle, is a a perfect draw.  Visit www.GreatLakesUSA.co.uk to learn more about how the Great Lakes’ states attract travelers from overseas.
Click to Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/dave.mp3]

 

 

 

 

Ben Negron

Meijer Shows Commitment to Dexter:  Ben Negron, Store Director, Meijer on Jackson Road – With 204 stores, Michigan-based Meijer continues to expand its presence.  Its latest store in Detroit is a great example of its commitment to the community.  Likewise for its sponsorship of Dexter Daze.  Ben Negron, whose Jackson Road store is one of Meijer’s flagship stores, says the concept is simple.  Six percent of Meijer’s net proceeds is invested right back into the community.
Click to Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/negron.mp3]

 

 

 

Click & Listen to HOUR 3 (9 AM-10 AM): [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/lal-3.mp3]

 

Mike Bavineau

Dexter H.S. Athletics – Mike Bavineau, Dexter H.S. Athletic Director – It has been a tumultuous couple of years for the Dexter High School Athletic Department with turnovers in leadership both in administration and coaching.  That has all changed under the direction of the new athletic director.
Click & Listen:
[audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/bavineau.mp3]

 

 

Larry Cobler

Dexter Rotary Playhouse Raffle:  Larry Cobler, President, Dexter Rotary  – Someone is going to take a piece of Dexter home with them, thanks to the Dexter Rotary Club.  It’s a miniature replica of a Dexter restaurant.
Click & Listen:
[audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/cobbler.mp3]

 

 

 

 

Dr. Brent Kolb

Parading through Dexter – Dr. Brent Kolb, Dexter Family Dentistry / Dexter Daze Parade Vice Chair –  A marching band, floats, classic cars, and even classic tractors, were all featured in this year’s parade.  Dr. Kolb explains how the parade comes together each year.  A special thank you to Dr. Kolb for the use of his phone line for our live broadcast.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/kolb.mp3]

 

 

 

Damian Farrell 2

Damian on Design:  Downsizing – Damian Farrell, Damian Farrell Design Group – If you’re downsizing, how do you capture all the functions of living, eating cooking, gathering, watching TV/movies, reading, working, relaxing, keeping important sentimental/useful things when you’re faced with a very pared down list?
Click to Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/damian.mp3]

 

 

 

Dexter in the MittenKatherine Larson

 


Dexter in the Mitten:  Katherine Larson, Artist –
A fine artist, muralist, graphic designer, and classical singer, Katherine Larson is known for her many covers of the Ann Arbor Observer, and for her drawing of Ann Arbor..and the Rest of the World.  Now she has captured the quaint community of Dexter with her Dexter in the Mitten.

Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/larson.mp3]

 

 

Tracy Lambert

 

Kid-Friendly Fun:  Tracy Lambert, Dexter Daze Event Coordinator – A lot of consideration was given to the little ones’ fun at Dexter Daze, something that Tracy Lambert knows well.  She’s about ready to have her third baby!
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/lambert.mp3]

 

 

Beverly Hill 2

Non-Profit Spotlight: Dexter Historical Society & Museum –  Beverly Hill,
Board Member –
The village council approved a charitable gaming license application from the DAHS to run the annual $10,000 raffle, which use to be overseen by the Kiwanians.  Proceeds will be used to help pay down the mortgage on the Gordon Hall Mansion.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/080513/npo.mp3]

 

 

 

Dexter Daze Photos:

Dexter Daze Street Scene

 

 

 

 

Dexter Daze banner over Main Street.
1290 WLBY broadcast booth is to the left.

 

 

 

 

Dexter Daze Remote Broadcast Booth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Dr. Brent Kolb and
his Family Dentistry office for
providing us with a phone line
for our broadcast!  Thanks also to
Aubree’s for our sidewalk space
in front of their location.

 

Paula Palmer Burns in front of Aubree's

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paula Palmer Burns is the Past President of the Dexter
Area Chamber of Commerce and owner of Palmer Insurance

 

Sarah Thomas with equipment at Dexter Daze

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Thomas is the new Production Director at
Ann Arbor Radio, home of 1290 WLBY.

 

Schultz Family
Dexter Area Chamber of Commerce President
Joe Schultz and family.

 

James and Jim Seta, Barbara Visovatti, Sarah Seta

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim and Sarah Seta (in the yellow and pink shirts) are
the owner of Stucci’s, Mr. Pita, and Bearclaw Coffee
in Dexter.  They are with their son James and
Barbara Visovatti, who is an account executive with
Lance & Erskine Communications.

 

 

Production Director Brian Welch

 

 

 

 

 

Ann Arbor Radio Production Director Brian Welch

 

 

 

THE DEXTER DAZE PARADE!

Balloons and MarchersBoy Scouts marching in the Dexter Daze Parade

 

 

 

 

Colors the ClownDexter HS Marching Band

 

 

 

 

 

Doletzky's Oil Pull Tractor

Doletzky's Oil Pull Tractor 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blast Corn Maze and Cow TrainCow Train

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical PlayhouseKids in Pontoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michigan Academy of Dance & MusicDexter Rotary Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colors the ClownChoo Choo Train

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dester Kiwanis Club in the Dexter Daze ParadeJohn Deere Tractor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ladies Marching in the Dexter Daze ParadeDexter Fire Department in the Dexter Daze Parade

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cars 1 ThunderbirdCars 2 Golf Cart

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cars 3 Black CarCars 7 OldCars 7 with Rumble SeatCars 8 Roadster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dreads Youth FootballUnion Baseball Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

Union Baseball Club 2Union Baseball Club 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washtenaw County Mounted Sheriff's PatrolLining up for the Dexter Daze Parade

 

 

The Lucy Ann Lance Show, 1290 WLBY – Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Race Based Admissions, Diversity, and the Poor on College Campuses: Dr. Dwight Lang, Sociology Lecturer, University of Michigan – Could dropping race in college admissions actually increase diversity on college campuses?

Listen to Hour 1: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/7-16a.mp3]
Listen to Hour 2: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/7-16b.mp3]

 

Dwight Lang

 

 

Race Based Admissions, Diversity, and the Poor on College Campuses:  Dr. Dwight Lang, Sociology Lecturer, University of Michigan – Could dropping race in college admissions actually increase diversity on college campuses?  Read Dr. Lang’s op-ed piece in the Detroit Free Press here.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/lang.mp3]

 

 

 

 

Bob Pierce and Susan Bauer

 

Chelsea Area Chamber of Commerce: Business Booster Membership Plan  – Bob Pierce, Chamber Executive Director; Susan Bauer, Chamber Membership Coordinator A special membership at the chamber will net you special discounts and promotions just for joining.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/chelsea.mp3]

 

 

 

 

 

Larry Eiler April 2013Carol LopuckiJennifer DeamudRe:NEW Michigan: Help for Start-Ups and Small BusinessLarry Eiler, CEO, Eiler Communications; Carol Lopucki, State Director, MI-SBTDC; Jennifer Deamud, Associate State Director, MI-SBTDC – Starting a small business?  Developing a business plan?  Need a loan?  The place to start is the Michigan Small Business & Technology Center.  This 11-region statewide network enhances Michigan’s economic well-being by providing counseling, training, research, and advocacy for new ventures, existing small busiesses, and innovative technology companies.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/renew.mp3]

 

 

John Ulzheimer 2

 

Credit Scores:  John Ulzheimer, President of Consumer Education, SmartCredit.com – You’ve seen and heard the ads.  Visit a website and get your “free” credit score.  Here’s what you need to know to obtain a truly free credit score to determine your creditworthiness.  Visit the government sponsored website, www.AnnualCreditReport.com once a year to get your free federal credit report.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/ulzheimer.mp3]

 

 

 

Rick Stites and Doug White

West Washtenaw Business Association: Golf – Take Your Game to the Next Level – Rick Stites, WWBA President; Doug White, Director of Instruction, Reddeman Farms Golf & Country Club – After a 30 year career inn golf operations as PGA Head Professional at Barton Hills Country Club and Ann Arbor Golf & Outing, Doug White is continuing his passion for the game at Reddeman Farms.  He also introduces us to a new version of the game, using a device called the big cup.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/wwba.mp3]

 

 

 

 

Martin Bandyke July 2013Art Fair Music Stage – Martin Bandyke, Morning Show Host, Ann Arbor’s 107one – The Ann Arbor Art Fair isn’t just about tacile art.  It’s also four days of free music on the 107one Main Stage at the South U Art Fair, July 17- 20. This year’s lineup includes Friday headliner The Unlikely Candidates, a special reunion performance by Nervous But Excited, and local favorites Ben Daniels Band, The Finer Things.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/071513/bandyke.mp3]

 

The Lucy Ann Lance Show, 1290 WLBY – Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Keeping Kids Safe at the Ann Arbor Art Fair – Rick Norman, Director of Emergency Management, City of Ann Arbor – There’s a new way to keep track of your children at this year’s Ann Arbor Art Fair…

Listen to Hour 1: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/070813/7-10a.mp3]
Listen to Hour 2: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/070813/7-10b.mp3]

 

Rick Norman

 

Keeping Kids Safe at the Ann Arbor Art Fair – Rick Norman, Director of Emergency Management, City of Ann Arbor – There’s a new way to keep track of your children at this year’s Ann Arbor Art Fair.  In the event that your child becomes separated from you, you’ll want to make sure to take this precaution first.  The Ann Arbor Art Fair is Wednesday, July 17-20, 2013.  Pick-up your free children’s wristband at these locations:  The Ann Arbor Police & Fire Tent at Liberty Plaza (Division & Liberty Streets); American Red Cross booths; Art Fair Information booths; Ann Arbor Emergency Management Mobile Command Unit; Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Volunteers (look for the yellow vests); AATA Shuttle Buses; Art Fair Trolleys.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/070813/norman.mp3]

 

 
Art Trapp and Marc Browning

 

 

Saline Area Chamber of Commerce: VOIP for Your Business – Art Trapp, Chamber Executive Director; Marc Browning, CEO, IVSComm Voice Over Internet Protocol (or VOIP) uses an internet connection instead of standard phone lines to provide service for phone communication.  This gives businesses and institutions the ability to put all their phones under one integrated solution, saving added service costs.
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/070813/saline.mp3]

 

 

 

Janet Larson

 

Manchester Area Chamber of Commerce: Manchester Barn Quilt Tour – Janet Larson, Chamber President: A novelist will visit Manchester in August to tour the area’s barn quilts and include the experience in a forthcoming book. 
Click & Listen:
[audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/070813/manchester.mp3]

 

 

 

Derk Wilcox

 

 

Judge Rules on Teachers’ Lawsuit Against Union –   Derk Wilcox, Senior Attorney, Mackinac Center Legal Foundation – Three teachers, all of whom have taught in Taylor, Michigan for several years and who objected to paying union dues, filed suit to counter the forced dues extension.  A new four-year contract was ratified earlier this year, along with the separate 10-year forced dues clause.  A Wayne County Circuit Court judge now says she lacks jurisdiction to decide the legality of the clause.  So, what’s next in the teachers’ fight against Taylor Federation of Teachers-Local 1085 and the Taylor School District and what does this mean for other teachers who disagree with their unions?
Click & Listen: [audio:http://www.lance-erskine.com/audio/070813/wilcox.mp3]